Sleep Apnea and That Sound Your Husband Makes: What It Says About His Health

A woman plugging her ears and man snoring in bedSleep apnea is a potentially serious medical disorder that affects between 50 and 70 million adults in the United States. Sleep apnea occurs when a person’s breathing is repeatedly blocked during sleep. Blockage of the airway causes snoring, and if severe, can cause low oxygen, elevated blood pressure and damage to the brain and heart over time. Sleepiness, fatigue, depression, and loss of sexual drive can also result. If your loved one snores and feels tired or sleepy after a full night’s rest, he may be suffering from sleep apnea.

Common symptoms of sleep apnea

Many factors can lead to Sleep Apnea and snoring including excess weight, problems with a small air passage and receding jaw or other problems with the airway. Excess weight is commonly associated with sleep apnea and that snoring sound. When an overweight or obese person is sleeping, his or her throat and tongue muscles become more relaxed, closing off the upper passages of their airway.

Loud, repetitive snoring isn’t only a nuisance, it’s one of the main indicators of sleep apnea. Here are three main indicators of obstructive sleep apnea:

  1. Loud, persistent snoring
  2. Pauses in breathing, along with gasping attacks while sleeping
  3. Excessive sleepiness while awake
  4. Morning headaches
  5. Difficulty paying attention
  6. Irritability
  7. Auto Accidents

It is important to note that many people who snore do not have obstructive sleep apnea, however most people who do have sleep apnea, snore.

Common risk factors of sleep apnea

Sleep apnea is often a byproduct of other health factors, including:

  • Excess weight
    Fat deposits in and around the upper airway may obstruct breathing
  • Neck circumference
    Surprisingly, those with thicker necks may have narrower airways
  • Narrow airway
    Narrow throat, enlarged tonsils or adenoids may also block the throat
  • Gender
    Men are two to three times more likely to have sleep apnea than women before menopause. After menopause women are as likely as men to suffer from Sleep Apnea
  • Age
    This disorder is most common in older adults
  • Genetics
    A family history of sleep apnea may increase your risk
  • Alcohol or drug use
    These substances relax the throat muscles, which can worsen obstructive sleep apnea
  • Smoking
    Smokers are three times more likely to struggle with sleep apnea

If you think your husband or anyone else in your family is struggling with sleep apnea or snoring, contact Pomona Valley Health Centers at 909-536-1493. We can conduct a sleep evaluation and test, help treat underlying conditions and help you both rest more peacefully.

Male-Specific Diseases to Ask Your Doctor About

A man with a doctorMen have specific health risks they need to be aware of—particularly in regards to the reproductive system. The male reproductive system is designed to produce, maintain and transport sperm. The testes, a part of the male reproductive system, are also responsible for producing testosterone. Testosterone is an essential hormone that helps maintain bone density, fat distribution and muscle strength in men.

Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned about these male-specific diseases

If you’ve been reluctant to go to the doctor, the experienced physicians at Pomona Valley Health Centers urge you to make an appointment. That sluggishness you feel may be attributed to a busy schedule or lack of sleep could be something more. Here are the male-specific diseases you should ask your doctor about:

  • Prostate cancer
    About one in nine men will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime. Prostate cancer occurs when there is an uncontrolled growth of cells in the prostate gland. This walnut-sized gland, located between the bladder and penis, is responsible for producing seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. The good news is that it can be cured when it is detected and treated early. Common symptoms of prostate cancer include pain during urination, difficulty urinating, more frequent urges to urinate at night, loss of bladder control and decreased flow of urine. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, we urge you to seek medical attention.
  • Testicular cancer

Approximately 8,000 to 10,000 men develop testicular cancer each year. Testicular cancer occurs when the cell growth inside one or both testicles becomes abnormal. It is the most common cancer in 20-35 year old men. Like prostate cancer, testicular cancer has an excellent cure rate—when it is detected and treated early.

For more information about getting treatment for male-specific diseases, please call Pomona Valley Health Centers at 909-536-1493.

Tips for Living Longer: Six Things Men Should Do to Live 5 Years Longer

A man tired at the wheelLiving longer is often attributed to living a healthy lifestyle, but what does that really mean? For men, it has a lot to do with focusing on heart health—the leading cause of death among men in the United States.

Living longer with heart-healthy living

The good news is people are living longer than ever before. If you want to live a healthy lifestyle, here are six things you can do right away:

  1. Eat more whole foods
    It is well known that processed foods (chicken nuggets, hot dogs, soda, etc.) are linked to obesity, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. Instead, reach for healthier alternatives like fresh fruit, vegetables, lean meats and whole grains when hunger calls.
  2. Move your body
    Regular exercise is the key to good health and a healthy heart. A quick, 15-minute walk each day is one of the easiest ways to living a longer and healthier life.
  3. Get plenty of rest
    Focus on living longer by getting the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep per night. Up the ante by going to bed and waking up at similar times each day.
  4. Get social
    Socializing with friends is a good way to start living longer. Laughter, humor and happiness help you manage stress and strengthen your immune system. As it turns out, laughter really is the best medicine.
  5. Schedule—and keep—doctor appointments
    Regular health screenings protect you, so you can continue caring and providing for your family. Call Pomona Valley Health Centers and schedule your check-up today.
  6. Stop smoking
    Though it can be difficult to break a nicotine addiction, your blood pressure and circulation improve shortly after quitting. Your risk of getting cancer (the second leading cause of death among men) also decreases every smoke-free year.

The physicians at Pomona Valley Health Centers are equipped with the latest technologies and skills to help the people in our community live longer lives. It’s time to call 909-536-1493 and schedule a check-up today.

World Alzheimer’s Day: How to Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory, thinking, and other important mental functions. As the disease progresses, it affects a person’s ability to carry out simple tasks like getting dressed or making a cup of coffee. There are an estimated 5.8 million people living with this disease in the United States alone. While Alzheimer’s is most common in people aged 65 years or older, nearly 200,000 people in the United States suffer from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease. How can I reduce my risk for Alzheimer’s disease? Alzheimer’s disease is often associated with old age, but it’s not a normal part of aging. Though there is no proven way to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, there’s a lot you can do to lower your chance of getting it. In fact, the same things that are good for your heart and body may also reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease, including: • Regular Check-ups Research shows a strong connection between Alzheimer’s and conditions like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Visiting the doctor for regular preventive care screenings will help lower your risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Preventive care focuses on illness and disease prevention and includes wellness visits, immunizations, and screenings for blood pressure, cancer, cholesterol, depression, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes. • Regular Exercise Excess weight increases your risk for conditions like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Research has also found that obesity can change the brain in a way that increases your risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Regular exercise helps increase blood flow to the brain, which makes your brain healthier. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends 30 minutes of activity at least five times a week. • Regular Stimulation People who keep learning and stay social might have a lower risk for the cognitive decline typically associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Though the exact reason is not clear, this type of mental stimulation may strengthen connections between nerve cells in the brain. When you see your doctor regularly, they can detect and treat conditions or diseases early, before they become serious or life threatening. Get the corWorld Alzheimer’s Day: How to Reduce Your Risk For Alzheimer’s Disease Family Medicine.

Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory, thinking, and other important mental functions. As the disease progresses, it affects a person’s ability to carry out simple tasks like getting dressed or making a cup of coffee.

There are an estimated 5.8 million people living with this disease in the United States alone. While Alzheimer’s is most common in people aged 65 years or older, nearly 200,000 people in the United States suffer from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

How can I reduce my risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

Alzheimer’s disease is often associated with old age, but it’s not a normal part of aging. Though there is no proven way to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, there’s a lot you can do to lower your chance of getting it. In fact, the same things that are good for your heart and body may also reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease, including:

  • Regular Check-ups
    Research shows a strong connection between Alzheimer’s and conditions like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Visiting the doctor for regular preventive care screenings will help lower your risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Preventive carefocuses on illness and disease prevention and includes wellness visits, immunizations, and screenings for blood pressure, cancer, cholesterol, depression, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes.
  • Regular Exercise
    Excess weight increases your risk for conditions like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Research has also found that obesity can change the brain in a way that increases your risk for Alzheimer’s disease.Regular exercise helps increase blood flow to the brain, which makes your brain healthier. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends 30 minutes of activity at least five times a week.
  • Regular Stimulation
    People who keep learning and stay social might have a lower risk for the cognitive decline typically associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Though the exact reason is not clear, this type of mental stimulation may strengthen connections between nerve cells in the brain.

When you see your doctor regularly, they can detect and treat conditions or diseases early, before they become serious or life threatening. Get the correct health services, screenings, and treatment you need live a longer and healthier life from the board-certified physicians at PVHC Family Medicine.

Measles Continues to Spread: Who Is at Risk?

Measles Continues to Spread: Who Is at Risk?

Did you know the bacteria in your coughs and sneezes can stay alive in the air for up to 45 minutes? Measles is a highly contagious disease that spreads easily through airborne respiratory droplets expelled by a cough or sneeze. That puts a lot of people at risk (often unknowingly).

In 2000, measles was declared an eliminated disease in the United States. In recent years, however, there has been a surge of people reluctant to vaccinate. As a result, we are seeing an uptick in measles cases. This is particularly true in communities with low vaccination rates. To create an adequate blanket of protection for everyone, between 93 and 95 percent of the population must be vaccinated.

Who is at risk for measles?

Besides those who have decided not to get vaccinated, certain people are at a heightened risk of contracting this disease. Reasons include age, health conditions, or other factors like pregnancy. Here is a list of people who can not, or should not, get a measles vaccination:

  • Babies and small children who are too young to be fully vaccinated.
  • Elderly individuals who are sick or have a weakened immune system.
  • Anyone with a history of severe or life-threatening allergic reactions to any MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine.
  • Women who are pregnant.
  • Anyone with a weakened immune system due to HIV, AIDS, radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or steroids.
  • Anyone with a family history of immune system problems.
  • Anyone with a condition that causes them to bruise or bleed easily.
  • Anyone who has recently had a blood transfusion or received other blood products.
  • Anyone who has tuberculosis.

Vaccinations are a vital part of preventative care, not just for yourself, but also for those around you who are unable to get vaccinated.

Protect your community today and get vaccinated against measles and other preventable diseases. Pomona Valley urgent care services in Chino Hills, Pomona, Claremont, and La Verneoffer onsite immunizations on top of their robust medical care services.

5 Tips on Staying Healthy for Men’s Health Month

5 Tips on Staying Healthy for Men’s Health MonthSixty percent of men do not go to the doctor for annual check ups.

That statistic is staggering, especially when you consider regular checkups can detect early stages of a number of diseases that affect men—including prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death among American men.

5 health tips for men’s health month

Men’s health month aims to heighten awareness of preventable health problems and encourage regular preventative health screenings. Here are five things you can do to live long and healthfully:

  1. Schedule an annual physical (every year)
    Even if you are feeling okay, an annual physical is one of the best ways to promote good health. It’s a good opportunity to check cholesterol, glucose, and blood pressure levels—three leading indicators of overall health.
  2. Get physical
    Take care of your heart and reduce stress with at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. It can be as simple as taking a brisk walk or playing with your children, grandchildren, or animals.
  3. Get rest
    Men need between 7 and 9 hours of sleep per night in order to perform at their best. If you’re not getting enough restorative slumber, you’re putting yourself at increased risk for certain respiratory diseases,type 2 diabetes, stroke, or heart disease.
  4. Stop smoking
    Each time you smoke, you’re increasing your risk of respiratory disease, lung cancer, and emphysema. Ask your doctor to help you quit.
  5. Eat the rainbow
    Fill your plate with colorful fruits, vegetables, and lean meats. Not only will these foods give your more energy than fast or processed foods, they are also helpful in preventing certain diseases, like prostate cancer.

If you’re looking for experienced, board-certified Family Medicine Doctors in Chino Hills, La Verne, Claremont and Pomona, make an appointment at one of our Pomona Valley Health Centers today. Call 909-630-7829.