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Male-Specific Diseases to Ask Your Doctor About

A man with a doctorMen have specific health risks they need to be aware of—particularly in regards to the reproductive system. The male reproductive system is designed to produce, maintain and transport sperm. The testes, a part of the male reproductive system, are also responsible for producing testosterone. Testosterone is an essential hormone that helps maintain bone density, fat distribution and muscle strength in men.

Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned about these male-specific diseases

If you’ve been reluctant to go to the doctor, the experienced physicians at Pomona Valley Health Centers urge you to make an appointment. That sluggishness you feel may be attributed to a busy schedule or lack of sleep could be something more. Here are the male-specific diseases you should ask your doctor about:

  • Prostate cancer
    About one in nine men will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime. Prostate cancer occurs when there is an uncontrolled growth of cells in the prostate gland. This walnut-sized gland, located between the bladder and penis, is responsible for producing seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. The good news is that it can be cured when it is detected and treated early. Common symptoms of prostate cancer include pain during urination, difficulty urinating, more frequent urges to urinate at night, loss of bladder control and decreased flow of urine. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, we urge you to seek medical attention.
  • Testicular cancer

Approximately 8,000 to 10,000 men develop testicular cancer each year. Testicular cancer occurs when the cell growth inside one or both testicles becomes abnormal. It is the most common cancer in 20-35 year old men. Like prostate cancer, testicular cancer has an excellent cure rate—when it is detected and treated early.

For more information about getting treatment for male-specific diseases, please call Pomona Valley Health Centers at 909-536-1493.