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Brain Injury Awareness Month: How to Tell If You Have a Concussion

Brain Injury Awareness Month: How to Tell If You Have a Concussion

Each year, approximately 1.4 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury. Brain injuries range from mild to severe; concussions are considered a mild traumatic brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain.

Motor vehicle accidents, falls and sports injuries are common causes of concussions. Though any sport that involves contact can also result in a concussion, particularly football, hockey and soccer are the most common.

Signs and symptoms of a concussion

Signs and symptoms that may occur shortly after sustaining a concussion may include:

  • Headache or feeling of pressure in the head
  • Temporary loss of consciousness
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Lethargy
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Ringing in the ears

Treatment options for concussions

All forms of concussions are serious. It’s important to seek medical attention from a local urgent care facility or emergency room as soon as possible to avoid complications. It’s very likely your urgent care or emergency room physician will recommend follow-up care and treatment from a primary care physician. If you play sports regularly, it’s especially important to seek continued care from a medical professional that is specially trained and experienced in the assessment and management of sports-related concussions

March is brain injury awareness month. A time to recognize the growing prevalence of brain injuries, empower the community and destigmatize the injuries. If you or a loved one has sustained a concussion, or repeated concussions in the past, the physicians at Pomona Valley Health Centers encourage you to share your experience. This will help others know they are not alone in their journey and help pass along seasoned advice and support.

If you are in need of expert concussion management, contact the skilled sports medicine physicians at Pomona Valley Health Centers at 909-536-1493. Our physicians are committed to providing excellent care from the acute injury to return-to-play (RTP).